Workshop: Inclusive service design: from unintentional exclusion to intentional inclusion (English)

Diversity and Inclusion is a critical topic in our work as designers. While the number of people talking about diversity and inclusion is increasing, we’re really after an increase in ACTION – what are service designers and organizations actually DOING about diversity and inclusion? Many organizations don’t know when or where to start.

In this hands-on workshop, we’ll examine the practices, processes, and tools of service design to look at ways that we can be more inclusive. We’ll look at methods to improve our service design activities and outcomes. And, we'll examine how we've unintentionally excluded people with disabilities from the process of service design, and how we can move towards inclusion and more complete service delivery.

When you leave, you will be better equipped to:

- Practice inclusion
- Examine your own methods for unintentional exclusion
- Consciously include people with disabilities in your process

 
 
 
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Derek Featherstone, Level Access

Derek Featherstone is an internationally known speaker and authority on accessibility and inclusive design. He has been working on the web since 1999, starting as a web developer. He migrated to the field of accessibility and quickly discovered the need to move thinking about accessibility and inclusion into the design process.

Derek is a former high school teacher, who brings his passion for education to the web industry. He founded and led an international team of accessibility and usability experts at Simply Accessible, working with high profile clients to ensure they were crafting and facilitating great user experiences for everyone, including people with disabilities.

Simply Accessible was recently acquired by Level Access, where Derek is now the Chief Experience Officer – focused on ensuring that accessibility and inclusion are seen as an integral part of user experience and service design, rather than as a simple checklist afterthought.